Saving Koalas - What You Can Do to Help

Educate yourself and your family - Learn about Koalas

Protect Koala Habitat

Prevent accidents and injuries - Drive carefully, control your dogs.

Donate to our fund - it will help build a better koala hospital.

There are estimated to only be between 40,000 to 50,000 koalas left in the wild so EVERY KOALA COUNTS!!

There are between 800-1000 koalas here on the island and OUR koalas appear to be Chlamydia free sand that is what makes what we do so important to sustain koala population in Australia

 

HELP!!! I have found an injured Koala - what do I do??

- A very sick Koala will usually be unable to climb away from threats such as people

If the Koala is obviously injured or unwell please contact:

Dr Ali 0428 785488

MIFCO 0427 918130

Tim Bee 0409 163012

Jay Wyatt 0405 677454 (pictured with one of his rescues)

Dr Bill 47 785 977

PLEASE follow the following  for the safety of all involved

Ring carers first if time allows

Keep ALL dogs away

Keep noise down

Keep people away- only the rescuers should be close

Towels or blankets can be gently placed around the animal from behind

Washing baskets or Pet Carriers should be used to contain the animal

Be KOALA AWARE - Koalas can bite and scratch badly to protect themselves so 

Never sit the Koala on your lap unrestrained in a car - if they rally or the shock wears off they will defend themselves

HELP!! There is a Koala in my yard and I have dogs - can you come and move the Koala?

- NO unless there is a clear and present danger to the koala - it is the property owner's responsibility to keep dangers away from the koala

- We don't know where they came from so best to let them move on by themselves

- They got in to your yard they will decide where they want to go themselves

- Keep dogs indoors until the Koala has moved on

- Do not disturb!! 

-Let them chill out in your tree- enjoy!

HELP!! There is a baby Koala - what do I do?

- In the words of the Great Koala Carer Ruth Lewis "is it bigger than a football or smaller?"

- If bigger than a football - it is large enough to be away from mum

- If smaller or if constantly squeaking it should be with Mum but....

_ if Mum is around leave them but continue to observe - baby is probably exploring and starting on the road to independence

- If NO Mum is sight for 2 hours - Baby likely been abandoned and needs to come in to care

Koala joeys emerge from the pouch at six months of age - they are still very small and will stay very close to the pouch at this stage 

As they grow they start to nibble at leaf as well as still drink milk when they return to the pouch.The joey will be with mum until 12 months of age (approximately 2 kg bodyweight) Mum at this stage is likely to have mated again - an annual event - and after 35 days of gestation will give birth to a fingernail sized pouch young baby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the older joey has not left mum by now at this stage he/she is required to move on. 

Mating season usually starts in August and lasts until March on Magnetic Island. 

This time period is also known as "Trauma Season"- this is usually the busiest time of the year for injured animals or abandoned joeys. Males and females are on the move looking for mates and can end up in backyards with dogs, or on roads with cars or in close proximity with people - all of which can be detrimental for the health of the koala

A female koala can be chased by an adult male and drop her backrider joey and that is when the joey can be abandoned

Sometimes the mum will return but many do not, so if found, the joey ends up in care with us. Often a small joey less than 1kg bodyweight will need to be in care for at least one year

We release our patients when they have reached at least 3 kg bodyweight to ensure that they have good body condition to survive when they transition back to life in the wild 

The smaller the joey the more frequently they require milk feeds - the same as for a human infant 

and this helps explain why Dr Ali often looks quite bleary eyed on the ferry going to work.

ABOUT US >

We are  the rescue and rehab facility for wild koalas on Magnetic Island.  We are a registered charity. Our Veterinarian is Dr Ali Bee. 

The hospital facility is NOT open to the public and we are unable to accept volunteers at this stage - sorry!

Please note: Dr Ali also works as a vet in Townsville and is not always immediately available

Other emergency numbers for Koala rescues are:

Magnetic Island Fauna Care Organisation (MIFCO) 0427 918130

Tim Bee 0409 163012

Jay Wyatt 0405 677454

© 2018 Magnetic Island Koala Hospital Ltd. All text and images are copyright.

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Contact - Please phone on:

T:   0428785488